Customizing Bitergia Analytics Dashboard for your goals and metrics

Bitergia keeps growing as a software development analytics firm and nowadays, we are helping a wide variety of clients (project & community managers, engineering & development teams, HR managers, business analysts, etc.). Obviously, they’re not looking for the same goals in their projects, neither for the same metrics. So, how can Bitergia Analytics dashboards be customized for their specific needs?

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Analyzing code review in Xen

The Xen project is an open source software project that does pre-commit peer code review. This means that every change to the source code follows a code review process, in which any developer can participate, before being accepted in the code base. During that process, the patch is carefully inspected and improved thanks to the contributions of the reviewers. The process takes place in the xen-devel mailing list.

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The Mitaka OpenStack mid-cycle quarterly report

[This post is based on the executive summary of the 2015-Q5 OpenStack Community Activity Report, sponsored by the OpenStack Foundation]

The October-Devember 2015 penStack Community Activity Report shows a stable growth of the OpenStack Community. As new repositories and teams keep being added, the number of projects keeps growing. On the other hand it is worth mentioning the decrease in activity during the latest quarters in project teams such as Nova, or stabilization of some others, such as Horizon or Cinder. This is a clear signal of the maturity reached by the some of the project teams in the OpenStack Foundation.

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Some developers are more equal than others

In a large free, open source software development community, not all developers are equal. Some are more experienced, some are better known, some know better how to adhere to the uses and customs of the project, some write code that is more easily accepted by others. One of the areas where these differences are more noticeable is the code review process. It is not equally easy for all developers to push their patches through code review. Even when the process itself tries to be fair and unbiased, well, “all developers are equal, but some are more equal than others”.

openstack-gerrit-db

Fortunately, we have plenty of data in the code review system. We can use analytics on that data to learn about how difficult it is for developers to get their patches accepted. We will use a OpenStack code review dashboard, composed with data from the OpenStack Gerrit instance to illustrate the process.

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Metrics to track a FOSS project

So you decided to use metrics to track your free, open source software (FOSS) community. Now comes the big question: Which metrics should I be tracking? The post “Top five open source community metrics to track” that I wrote for OpenSource.com deals exactly with answering that question.

activity-metrics

Based on our experience at Bitergia, the post proposes five families of metrics: activity, size, performance, demographics, and diversity. I’m sure that some important aspects may be missing, but still, this could be your first list of metrics to track, should you be interested in knowing about how your pet project is behaving. Go and read the full post if you are interested in more details.

Mid Liberty Release Cycle: OpenStack Quarterly Report

Finally we released a new version of the OpenStack Quarterly report. This is intended to provide insights about the software development process of the OpenStack projects. This covers information from several data sources such as Git, Launchpad, Gerrit, Mailing lists, ask.openstack.org and IRC channels. And it aims at providing quantitative and qualitative information about the activity, community and software process.

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Kilo: the new OpenStack release

[Updated results based on methodological changes]

Kilo, the new OpenStack release, shows a continuous increase of activity if compared to Juno. From Icehouse to Juno, there was an increase of 6.22% in the number of commits and 17,07% in the number of unique authors. From Juno to Kilo, there’s a higher jump in terms of commits (11,23%) and a lower increase in terms of authors (11,16%). However, with this increase, there is a new peak in the number of unique authors contributing to the OpenStack Foundation projects with close to 1,600 different people participating in its development.

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Data, data and data about your favourite community: GrimoireLib

[This post is part of the lightning talk presented at FOSDEM 2015. The talk was titled as “Data, data and data about your favourite community” whose slides are available in the Bitergia’s Speakerdeck place. The ipython notebook used for visualization purposes is accesible through nbviewer and can be downloaded in GitHub. This is a basic introduction to GrimoireLib.]

GrimoireLib aims at providing a transparency layer between the database and the user. This helps to avoid the direct access to the databases while providing a list of available metrics.

This is a Python-based library and expects an already generated database coming from some of the Metrics Grimoire tools. CVSAnalY, MailingListStats, Bicho and most of the tools are already supported by this library.

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