Dashboard celebrating 25 years of Linux development

To celebrate 25 years of Linux kernel development, we at Bitergia have produced the Linux development history dashboard. This dashboard visualizes the current Linux git repository from two points of view: the history of all commits (changes to the source code) up to now, and the history of all lines in the current version. The dashboard visualizes the main parameters about the development (the who, when and what) are visualized, and allows for drilling down in the data, for example finding the specific commits that lead to a specific part of the code.

linux-dashboard-blame

Do you want to learn about when the lines in the current kernel were authored? Who has participated in specific areas of the kernel? How many files have remain untouched for more than 10 years? Play with the dashboard and find your own interesting details!

The dashboard was produced using only free, open source software tools (among them, GrimoireLab, our tookit for software development analytics). If you want to learn more details, check the slides I intended to use for my presentation at LinuxCon, which unfortunately I couldn’t attend. Those provide some more insight about how it was produced, some examples about how it can be used, and some curiosities found by exploring it.

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5 reasons to have a Software Development Community Dashboard

Community managers spend their time in numerous community activities related with his/her main role: to get people to talk and contribute, react to the community managed, keep people engaged, etc. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) should be set for each community based on its goals. It’s part of the job to elaborate reports with multiple metrics on community health for example. But, measuring should be an effective task.

Keeping this in mind, I’d like to share with you 5 reasons about why community managers or any other professional related with software development should have a dashboard that provides all the data about the community or project that she/he manages:

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Understanding the code review process in OpenStack

As a part of our tests with Kibana and Elasticserch as frontends for our MetricsGrimoire databases, we’ve set up a dashboard for understanding the code review process in OpenStack (be sure of visiting it with a large screen and a reasonable CPU, otherwise your experience may be a bit frustrating).

Screenshot from 2015-10-22 00-24-53This dashboard includes information about all review processes (changesets) in OpenStack, using information obtained from their Gerrit instance. For each review, we have information such as the submitter (owner), the time it was first uploaded and accepted or abandoned, the number of patchsets (iterations) needed until it was accepted, and the time until it was merged or abandoned. With all of them we have prepared an active visualization that allows both to understand the big picture and to drill down looking for the details. Follow on reading to learn about some of these details.

[Note: this is our second post about our dashboards based on Kibana. If you’re interested, have a look at the first one, about OpenStack code contributions.]

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Testing Kibana: OpenStack code contributions dashboard

We at Bitergia are busy testing new stacks for analyzing and visualizing the software development data we collect. Some our latest tests involve using Kibana for visualization. In this case, we have prepared a dashboard showing the latest contribution data for OpenStack.

Screenshot from 2015-10-19 01-28-46Screenshot from 2015-10-19 01-29-27One of the nice things that these new dashboards allow is the level of filtering and drill down which is possible. For example, in the above dashboard, it is possible to click on any sector on a pie chart, on any entry of a table, on any bar in a bar chart, and the corresponding filter will act. This allows for obtaining specialized dashboards very easily, such as this one with the contributions by RedHat (produced by clicking on RedHat in the list of of top organizations, or the contributions to Liberty, the latest release cycle of OpenStack, by selecting the corresponding period (last bar) in the “OpenStack ten top organizations by release” chart.

If you’re interested in learning about some tips and tricks about what can be done with these dashboards, follow on reading…

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Akademy 2014

Pretty late writing about the Akademy, but I really wanted to share my experience with this community.

First of all and as a disclaimer, I already knew some members of the community, so this was not my first time with them. I have always enjoyed my time with them and get pretty useful feedback.

This visit was related to the KDE devleopment dashboard that Bitergia prepared in collaboration with some KDE developers.

kde-main-page

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How the automotive industry is participating in the development of GENIVI: BMW and Itestra leaders

After our visit to the Open Automotive’14 hosted by the Genivi Alliance, we have prepared a new version of the activity dashboard based on the preliminary Genivi Alliance report.

BMW (> 1,500 commits) keeps growing in the community, being the leader of the open source development process in GENIVI ecosystem, or at least to the publicly available repositories that Bitergia has had access. However, we do not find another automobile and engine manufacturing company until Ford (10 commits), with a discrete development participation. Although raising to the 5th position if counting commits from its owned subsidiary Livio Connect.

Top 10 affiliations contribution to the development of the GENIVI open source ecosystem

Top 10 affiliations contribution to the development of the GENIVI open source ecosystem

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The OpenStack Icehouse release: activity and organizations

[This post is based on the Executive Summary and other sections of the full report about OpenStack and the Icehouse release (part of OpenStack reports) and data retrieved from the OpenStack Activity Board, both developed by Bitergia]

At the moment of this analysis OpenStack projects are close to reach the 74,000 commits since their start as observed in the Activity Board. That activity was developed by more than 2,000 different contributors that at some point started 68,000 code reviews processes and sent and reviewed close to 270,000 different patches. There are more than 33,600 reports in the ticketing system, that were opened by 3,303 different participants. And high activity is also registered in the discussions forums, with close to 52,000 emails messages posted by 2,800 participants and more than 6,200 questions in the OpenStack question and answer tool.

Focus on the development activity, developers can be divided into 246 core developers, 461  with regular activity and 1,214 occasional ones that at some point submitted some patches and contributed to the code.

Structure of the OpenStack community of developers

Structure of the OpenStack community of developers

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