New GrimoireLab packages! (and how to use them)

We’ve just uploaded to pypi a new collection of GrimoireLab Python packages suitable for direct installation with pip. Please, upgrade your virtual environments!!!

These packages allow for a very easy use of most GrimoireLab tools. For example, assuming you have ElasticSearch and Kibana installed locally (or available as cloud services), producing a fairly complete software development dashboard from scratch for a git project is just a matter of running a few commands.

kibana-dashboard

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New release of Perceval: Slack support now available!

Perceval is the Grimoire Lab tool that gives the first step for allowing Grimoire to gather automatic and incremental data for almost any tool related with contributing to Open Source.

Grimoire Lab architecture draft, showing its different pieces

Grimoire Lab Architecture (draft). Some pieces still under heavy development

Perceval goes on the quest to retrieve and gather data from git, GitHub, Bugzilla, JIRA, Gerrit, mbox, pipermail, StackExchange, Discourse, etc.   for producing valuable indices, with GrimoireELK.

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Dashboard celebrating 25 years of Linux development

To celebrate 25 years of Linux kernel development, we at Bitergia have produced the Linux development history dashboard. This dashboard visualizes the current Linux git repository from two points of view: the history of all commits (changes to the source code) up to now, and the history of all lines in the current version. The dashboard visualizes the main parameters about the development (the who, when and what) are visualized, and allows for drilling down in the data, for example finding the specific commits that lead to a specific part of the code.

linux-dashboard-blame

Do you want to learn about when the lines in the current kernel were authored? Who has participated in specific areas of the kernel? How many files have remain untouched for more than 10 years? Play with the dashboard and find your own interesting details!

The dashboard was produced using only free, open source software tools (among them, GrimoireLab, our tookit for software development analytics). If you want to learn more details, check the slides I intended to use for my presentation at LinuxCon, which unfortunately I couldn’t attend. Those provide some more insight about how it was produced, some examples about how it can be used, and some curiosities found by exploring it.

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Adding Jenkins activity metrics. Early preview

On Monday, June 20th, our colleague Jesús will be in Berlin for OPNFV Design Summit to present The Quantitative State of OPNFV.[Update]: slides available, Jun, 20th, 2016.

OPNFV is one of the open source projects hosted by Linux Foundation and we have been working for them for almost a year, deploying and maintaining a Metrics Grimoire based Bitergia Dashbobard and detailed quarterly reports. But, meanwhile, we have been developing the new GrimoireLab toolkit, so we have some new things to show in Berlin for our OPNFV friends…

OPNFV MetricsGrimoire and GrimoireLab based dashboards

OPNFV MetricsGrimoire and GrimoireLab based dashboards

We have built a GrimoireLab based dashboard for OPNFV, but with some extra goodies!

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5 reasons to have a Software Development Community Dashboard

Community managers spend their time in numerous community activities related with his/her main role: to get people to talk and contribute, react to the community managed, keep people engaged, etc. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) should be set for each community based on its goals. It’s part of the job to elaborate reports with multiple metrics on community health for example. But, measuring should be an effective task.

Keeping this in mind, I’d like to share with you 5 reasons about why community managers or any other professional related with software development should have a dashboard that provides all the data about the community or project that she/he manages:

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Understanding the code review process in OpenStack

As a part of our tests with Kibana and Elasticserch as frontends for our MetricsGrimoire databases, we’ve set up a dashboard for understanding the code review process in OpenStack (be sure of visiting it with a large screen and a reasonable CPU, otherwise your experience may be a bit frustrating).

Screenshot from 2015-10-22 00-24-53This dashboard includes information about all review processes (changesets) in OpenStack, using information obtained from their Gerrit instance. For each review, we have information such as the submitter (owner), the time it was first uploaded and accepted or abandoned, the number of patchsets (iterations) needed until it was accepted, and the time until it was merged or abandoned. With all of them we have prepared an active visualization that allows both to understand the big picture and to drill down looking for the details. Follow on reading to learn about some of these details.

[Note: this is our second post about our dashboards based on Kibana. If you’re interested, have a look at the first one, about OpenStack code contributions.]

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Testing Kibana: OpenStack code contributions dashboard

We at Bitergia are busy testing new stacks for analyzing and visualizing the software development data we collect. Some our latest tests involve using Kibana for visualization. In this case, we have prepared a dashboard showing the latest contribution data for OpenStack.

Screenshot from 2015-10-19 01-28-46Screenshot from 2015-10-19 01-29-27One of the nice things that these new dashboards allow is the level of filtering and drill down which is possible. For example, in the above dashboard, it is possible to click on any sector on a pie chart, on any entry of a table, on any bar in a bar chart, and the corresponding filter will act. This allows for obtaining specialized dashboards very easily, such as this one with the contributions by RedHat (produced by clicking on RedHat in the list of of top organizations, or the contributions to Liberty, the latest release cycle of OpenStack, by selecting the corresponding period (last bar) in the “OpenStack ten top organizations by release” chart.

If you’re interested in learning about some tips and tricks about what can be done with these dashboards, follow on reading…

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