CHAOSS has been released. And GrimoireLab is part of it!

Today is an important milestone for GrimoireLab. Our little project has joined the set of The Linux Foundation projects to help open source ecosystems development. That Metrics Grimoire rewriting we started two years ago, to make easier for OSS projects and community managers to analyze software communities and development processes, has become part of a big family.

During Open Source Summit North America opening keynotes, Jim Zemlin, The Linux Foundation executive director, has presented CHAOSS (Community Health Analytics Open Source Software).

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Something big is coming! Join us in the Open Source Summit in Los Angeles

Last year we missed the LinuxCon North America, but this won’t happen again for the Open Source Summit in Los Angeles. There’ll be an important announcement for Grimoire Lab during Monday’s keynotes.

Sadly, you’ll need to join us there, follow the streaming, wait for the press release or join the new Grimoire Lab mailing list to get some news in advance…

But, there are not one but several more things related with Bitergia and Grimoire Lab happening during the Open Source Summit North America:

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Gender Diversity Studies and Talks Summary

When looking back nowadays to the work done on diversity, I’ve realized that it has been quite a trip! My first approach to the topic was in an informal meeting with Nithya Ruff, currently at Comcast. She mentioned that the OpenStack Summit in Tokyo reached (as far as I remember!) 13% of women attending the Summit. And this was a great number if compared to previous summits as the percentage kept growing. But she also mentioned that they received a tweet asking about the current number of technical contributions. Then this is where we decided to have a look at that issue: have numbers, and try to produce some of them from a quantitative point of view.

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Meet us at FOSDEM!

We are so excited about starting the new year with our contribution and participation at FOSDEM 2017.

Fosdem 2017

FOSDEM is the strongest reference event for developers and geeks to meet and know the hottest incoming tech topics since 17 years ago.

In 2000, Raphael Bauduin, a Linux fan from Belgium, decided to organize a small event for Open Source developers. He named it ‘Open Source Developers European Meeting’ (OSDEM). From the second edition OSDEM became FOSDEM and every year host more than 5000 developers and Open Source geeks.

FOSDEM is our natural environment. We have joined it in a lots of editions and we are very proud to come again this year as speakers. We are also going to set up a stand for chatting with all our friends with special gifts for our community.

These will be our contributions to FOSDEM 2017:

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Inner Sourcing vs commoditification of software

“The idea is beginning to take root in even the most secretive corporate cultures… Its power lies in the inherent social nature of the creative process. When developers are able to access, use and build upon what their colleagues are creating, innovation can really take hold.”

Phil Granof in Wired

As we detailed in the previous post, adopting Inner Source practices creates great benefits for  companies such as saving cost, faster time to market and enabling innovation.
Commodification of Software
There’s no doubt that Inner source needs a different approach  to project management  but “hands on!” What’s the best project to start Inner Sourcing?

Software is becoming the core of most business, even the traditional ones. However it doesn’t mean that companies should build all the software they need, most of it can be easily bought or outsourced with low cost, in order to focus their efforts on their core business. Thus, Inner Source should help to add value to organizations running away from commodity.

This was the case for Philips Healthcare. Klaas-Jan Stol and Brian Fitzgerald in their article Inner Source—Adopting Open Source Development Practices in Organizations recommended to start with a seed project. That means, not starting from scratch but choosing an existing initial implementation of a software product or component.
Frank Van Der Linden, CTO at Phillips was responsible for and pioneered the setting up Inner Source within the company. He decided to start with a component suite of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) standard, used in many medical imaging tools such as x-ray and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scanners. Philips Healthcare has a product line for diagnostic techniques in Hospitals, so they chose a core business software product for Inner Sourcing.

Van Der Linden reports enormous business benefits using Inner Sourcing as a process for developing:

  • Three times more product groups served.
  • Substantially improved product quality (Improved feedback from product groups)
  • Product groups find defects earlier.
  • Significant time to market gains.
  • Growing an active Inner Source community – Over 60% of the PH software community involved.

Philips and other companies running Inner Sourcing learned from Open Source projects, they understood how to align and coordinate efforts. In the next post, we will talk about essential tools to enable Inner Sourcing.

Some metrics of Open Source development in “the Cloud”

Are you still waiting for “The Year of the Desktop”? Not sure when it will happen, but it is clear that the Open Source movement around “Cloud Computing” is growing and growing.

The number of companies releasing Open Source code, contributing to Open Source cloud projects increases each month. A good example to see it is the “under developmentCNCF Grimoire Dashboard:

Table and chart showing CNCF organizations diversity numbers and evolution
CNCF organizations diversity numbers and evolution

And during these days, in events like CloudNativeCon and KubeCon we’ll see more data and insights about how big the open cloud ecosystem is becoming. Do you want a preview?

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