The Mitaka OpenStack mid-cycle quarterly report

[This post is based on the executive summary of the 2015-Q5 OpenStack Community Activity Report, sponsored by the OpenStack Foundation]

The October-Devember 2015 penStack Community Activity Report shows a stable growth of the OpenStack Community. As new repositories and teams keep being added, the number of projects keeps growing. On the other hand it is worth mentioning the decrease in activity during the latest quarters in project teams such as Nova, or stabilization of some others, such as Horizon or Cinder. This is a clear signal of the maturity reached by the some of the project teams in the OpenStack Foundation.

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Mid Liberty Release Cycle: OpenStack Quarterly Report

Finally we released a new version of the OpenStack Quarterly report. This is intended to provide insights about the software development process of the OpenStack projects. This covers information from several data sources such as Git, Launchpad, Gerrit, Mailing lists, ask.openstack.org and IRC channels. And it aims at providing quantitative and qualitative information about the activity, community and software process.

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Kilo: the new OpenStack release

[Updated results based on methodological changes]

Kilo, the new OpenStack release, shows a continuous increase of activity if compared to Juno. From Icehouse to Juno, there was an increase of 6.22% in the number of commits and 17,07% in the number of unique authors. From Juno to Kilo, there’s a higher jump in terms of commits (11,23%) and a lower increase in terms of authors (11,16%). However, with this increase, there is a new peak in the number of unique authors contributing to the OpenStack Foundation projects with close to 1,600 different people participating in its development.

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Behind the big numbers on the Wikimedia code review process

Having a dashboard usually opens new paths to understand software development communities. This may be seen as the entry point that helps to understand the basics of a community. And on top of this, there may appear new questions related to those basics or to more advanced issues. This is the case of the new work we are working on with the Wikimedia community metrics analytics team: Core Reviewer and Participants.

  • Core reviewers are defined as those developers that can exercise a +2/-2 review in Gerrit. In addition to this, it is of interest for the community to remove auto merges. Although this is an undesired behaviour, that takes place, and those should be removed.
  • On the other hand, Participants in Gerrit are defined as any member leaving any type of trace in the system. In this set we can find reviews (-2,-1,+1,+2), uploads, comments and others.

It is interesting to notice that depending on the community, requirements are slightly different. In the case of the OpenStack community, there are extra requirements for the Core Reviewer definition. And this is that reviews should be found in master branch. This specific measure can be found in the OpenStack quarterly reports for each of the projects of the Foundation.

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Data, data and data about your favourite community: GrimoireLib

[This post is part of the lightning talk presented at FOSDEM 2015. The talk was titled as “Data, data and data about your favourite community” whose slides are available in the Bitergia’s Speakerdeck place. The ipython notebook used for visualization purposes is accesible through nbviewer and can be downloaded in GitHub. This is a basic introduction to GrimoireLib.]

GrimoireLib aims at providing a transparency layer between the database and the user. This helps to avoid the direct access to the databases while providing a list of available metrics.

This is a Python-based library and expects an already generated database coming from some of the Metrics Grimoire tools. CVSAnalY, MailingListStats, Bicho and most of the tools are already supported by this library.

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Akademy 2014

Pretty late writing about the Akademy, but I really wanted to share my experience with this community.

First of all and as a disclaimer, I already knew some members of the community, so this was not my first time with them. I have always enjoyed my time with them and get pretty useful feedback.

This visit was related to the KDE devleopment dashboard that Bitergia prepared in collaboration with some KDE developers.

kde-main-page

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The OpenStack Juno release: activity and organizations

Within a few hours the OpenStack Juno release will be delivered. At the moment of writing this analysis the OpenStack Activity Board shows 91,317 commits spread across 108 repositories. All of this activity was performed by close to 2,600  developers, affiliated to about 230 different organizations. In addition, around 75,000 changesets have gone through code review, submitted by 3,082 developers.

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How the automotive industry is participating in the development of GENIVI: BMW and Itestra leaders

After our visit to the Open Automotive’14 hosted by the Genivi Alliance, we have prepared a new version of the activity dashboard based on the preliminary Genivi Alliance report.

BMW (> 1,500 commits) keeps growing in the community, being the leader of the open source development process in GENIVI ecosystem, or at least to the publicly available repositories that Bitergia has had access. However, we do not find another automobile and engine manufacturing company until Ford (10 commits), with a discrete development participation. Although raising to the 5th position if counting commits from its owned subsidiary Livio Connect.

Top 10 affiliations contribution to the development of the GENIVI open source ecosystem
Top 10 affiliations contribution to the development of the GENIVI open source ecosystem

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