Some developers are more equal than others

In a large free, open source software development community, not all developers are equal. Some are more experienced, some are better known, some know better how to adhere to the uses and customs of the project, some write code that is more easily accepted by others. One of the areas where these differences are more noticeable is the code review process. It is not equally easy for all developers to push their patches through code review. Even when the process itself tries to be fair and unbiased, well, “all developers are equal, but some are more equal than others”.

openstack-gerrit-db

Fortunately, we have plenty of data in the code review system. We can use analytics on that data to learn about how difficult it is for developers to get their patches accepted. We will use a OpenStack code review dashboard, composed with data from the OpenStack Gerrit instance to illustrate the process.

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Metrics to track a FOSS project

So you decided to use metrics to track your free, open source software (FOSS) community. Now comes the big question: Which metrics should I be tracking? The post “Top five open source community metrics to track” that I wrote for OpenSource.com deals exactly with answering that question.

activity-metrics

Based on our experience at Bitergia, the post proposes five families of metrics: activity, size, performance, demographics, and diversity. I’m sure that some important aspects may be missing, but still, this could be your first list of metrics to track, should you be interested in knowing about how your pet project is behaving. Go and read the full post if you are interested in more details.

The numbers of the Open Cloud (Tokyo edition)

During the last OpenStack Summit, in Tokyo, we presented the talk “The numbers of the Open Cloud“. Now it is online, including video and slides. The talk presented some aspects of the development process of OpenStack, Apache CloudStack, OpenNebula and Eucalyptus. It included some details about OpenStack, and some new Kibana-based dashboards for them (you can also have a look at our more recent OpenStack Gerrit activity and OpenStack Git activity dashboards).

Screenshot from 2015-12-08 22-42-13

This is the latest presentation of our series on quantitative analysis of the main free, open source software projects producing cloud infrastructure systems. See for example the first in the series, which was presented in OSCON 2014, and compare with the current situation.

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