Understanding the code review process in OpenStack

As a part of our tests with Kibana and Elasticserch as frontends for our MetricsGrimoire databases, we’ve set up a dashboard for understanding the code review process in OpenStack (be sure of visiting it with a large screen and a reasonable CPU, otherwise your experience may be a bit frustrating).

Screenshot from 2015-10-22 00-24-53This dashboard includes information about all review processes (changesets) in OpenStack, using information obtained from their Gerrit instance. For each review, we have information such as the submitter (owner), the time it was first uploaded and accepted or abandoned, the number of patchsets (iterations) needed until it was accepted, and the time until it was merged or abandoned. With all of them we have prepared an active visualization that allows both to understand the big picture and to drill down looking for the details. Follow on reading to learn about some of these details.

[Note: this is our second post about our dashboards based on Kibana. If you’re interested, have a look at the first one, about OpenStack code contributions.]

Continue reading “Understanding the code review process in OpenStack”

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Testing Kibana: OpenStack code contributions dashboard

We at Bitergia are busy testing new stacks for analyzing and visualizing the software development data we collect. Some our latest tests involve using Kibana for visualization. In this case, we have prepared a dashboard showing the latest contribution data for OpenStack.

Screenshot from 2015-10-19 01-28-46Screenshot from 2015-10-19 01-29-27One of the nice things that these new dashboards allow is the level of filtering and drill down which is possible. For example, in the above dashboard, it is possible to click on any sector on a pie chart, on any entry of a table, on any bar in a bar chart, and the corresponding filter will act. This allows for obtaining specialized dashboards very easily, such as this one with the contributions by RedHat (produced by clicking on RedHat in the list of of top organizations, or the contributions to Liberty, the latest release cycle of OpenStack, by selecting the corresponding period (last bar) in the “OpenStack ten top organizations by release” chart.

If you’re interested in learning about some tips and tricks about what can be done with these dashboards, follow on reading…

Continue reading “Testing Kibana: OpenStack code contributions dashboard”

Efficiency analysis in the OpenStack community Liberty release

Liberty is the new release of OpenStack. This shows an increase in activity and people participating in the development of OpenStack.

  • There are 25,268 commits in total merged into master thanks to the work of 1,873 different developers.
  • In order to have that code into master, it was necessary the effort of 2,239 people that submitted at least one patchset to Gerrit. That means that 83% of them are actual contributors of Liberty release.
  • In terms of community, Launchpad activity shows that 9,919 people helped participating in the bug tracking process, opening, commenting and closing tickets.
  • The mailing lists are a busy channel of communication with 1,742 participants, but IRC seems to be the preferred channel with more than 6,000 detected nicknames.
  • Ask.openstack.org is also an interesting communication channel where there have been 1,386 people participating and around 2,200 different questions.

As a disclaimer, this post will not focus on organizations participating in the OpenStack development, but in the software development process. Organizations information can be easily retrieved in the Activity Board. We believe that process in the OpenStack community is important and even more when we are talking about a team of more than 2,000 different contributors.

Efficiency of the community closing changesets

As mentioned, there have been more than 2,200 people in Liberty release that aimed at contributing with a patchset in the OpenStack community. And only a subset of those pieces of code were eligible to be part of the project and merged into master. However, not all of the people that were part of the that set were even reviewed. Each quarter, the community leaves around a 20% of the changesets population open. This can be observed in the following chart. The y-axis represents the percentage of changesets that were closed (abandoned or merged) per quarter (x-axis).

OpenStack_efficiencyclosingchangesets Continue reading “Efficiency analysis in the OpenStack community Liberty release”

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