How the new release of OpenStack was built

Today it is the day when Folsom, the new release of OpenStack, is publicly announced. We at Bitergia have been studying it for a while, and today we’re publishing our results as well. So, welcome to the report presenting the charts and numbers showing how OpenStack Folsom was built. For comparison, we’re also presenting a similar report on the previous major release of OpenStack, Essex, released on April, and with a similar release cycle of about six months. Both reports rely on data obtained from the source code management (git) and issue tracking (Launchpad) systems.

Data for Folsom OpenStack report
Data for Folsom OpenStack report

[Update, Oct 2 2012, 12:15 GMT. We’ve published some details on the methodology used to produce these reports]

[Update, Sep 28 2012, 16:00 GMT. We have included a new box in the main (summary) page of the study, showing the participation by companies in the 7 projects that OpenStack developers usually considers as “core OpenStack”, and which are those actually subject to the Folsom release cycle.]

The number of commits (changes to source code) is similar in both cases (and more when commits by bots is excluded), which tells about similar coding activity. The number of unique files touched is higher in the case of Essex which suggests that the work is getting more concentrated in certain parts of OpenStack. And the number of companies identified as contributors is quite similar.

Data for Essex OpenStack report
Data for Essex OpenStack report

However, when we come to a basic analysis of the community of developers (committers), it is easy to appreciate how it is growing, from 47 core developers in Essex to 71 in Folsom, and a similar increment for the whole population. The numbers of the issue tracking system show a similar story.

The list of companies contributing to OpenStack (measured by number of changes to the source code and by number of developers perming those changes) may be also of interest. Rackspace is the first contributor, with about a quarter of all commits, followed closely by RedHat, and at a certain distance by Nebula. Then, with comparable number of commits (but a very diverse number of developers involved) come HP, Isi, Cloudscaling, IBM, Sina, Canonical, Inktank and others.

Companies contributing to Folsom
List of companies contributing to OpenStack Folsom

The situation was more concentrated six months ago. For Essex, Rackspace amounted for most than half the commits. Redhat, Nebula and HP followed at a certain distance, and later came Canonical, Nicira, Citrix, Enovance, Cloudscaling, Isis and others. Looking at these numbers, it is clear that the OpenStack ecosystem of companies is now more leveled, with less dominance by Rackspace, and the clear emergence of other companies which seem to be betting hard to improve the code base.

Companies in OpenStack Essex
List of companies contributing to OpenStack Essex

The rest of this post deals with some methodological details about the report. You can have a look at them, and / or go straight to the full Folsom report, and its sections on general issues (analysis of commits and tickets), analysis per company, and analysis per project. Or you can compare them with those in the Essex report. You can also browse our previous posts, How companies are contributing to OpenStack, and Preview of the analysis of the upcoming OpenStack release which showed some preliminary results, and explained a bit the methodology for the companies analysis (but beware, both were done with only a fraction of the projects in OpenStack, so the data in the final report is much more complete).

Continue reading “How the new release of OpenStack was built”

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Preview of the analysis of the upcoming OpenStack release

[Update: We have finally published the complete report about OpenStack Folsom. Although the details mentioned here are still relevant, the numbers are much more complete and accurate in that final report.]

OpenStack is expected to release their next major version, codenamed Folsom, in a few days. To prepare for that release, we at Bitergia have performed an analysis on the development repositories of Folsom core projects (those that appear as “core projects” in the OpenStack Projects webpage plus the OpenStack Manuals project) with the aim of better understanding their release cycle since the last major release, back in early April. While we work on the final analysis, timed to get out when the new release is ready, you can have a look at a general preview of it, updated as of today.

Technical card
Techinical card with main figures for the study

Let’s start with some numbers. According to our data, during the five months and a half since the Essex release, the eight core projects composing OpenStack have been changed more than 3,400 times (number of commits), with those changes affecting more than 5,000 different files. These changes have been performed mostly by a core group of 62 developers, with a total of 283 developers making changes during this period. Those developers belong to 46 different companies.

Entering into details, we have structured the study in several sections: a general analysis of changes to source code and tickets, a per-project analysis, and a per-company analysis, complemented by a general summary. The study includes the evolution of several parameters (commits, developers, tickets open & closed, files touched, etc.) over the analyzed period. Most evolution charts are presenting metrics per week.

Companies and projects in OpenStack
Companies and projects in OpenStack, summary (click to access more details)

The rest of this post comments some of the data shown. You can have a look at it, and / or go straight to the full preview of the report. You can also have a look at our previous post, How companies are contributing to OpenStack, which showed some preliminary results, and explained a bit the methodology for the companies analysis. And stay tuned, our final report will be released when Folson is released…

Continue reading “Preview of the analysis of the upcoming OpenStack release”

How companies are contributing to OpenStack

[Update: We have finally published the complete report about OpenStack Folsom. Although the details mentioned here are still relevant, the numbers are much more complete and accurate in that final report.]

Since several months ago, OpenStack is one of our pet projects. We already contributed some stats to their weekly newsletter back in April, and the project was also a matter of study for Analyzing Risks associated to FLOSS Communities, one of our LinuxTag 2012 talks. Now, here we come back to it, with a preview of a wider study we’re preparing. This one is on how companies are contributing to the maintenance and improvement of OpenStack, based on the analysis of its (many) git repositories [see the full preview of the study].

OpenStack: main charts based on git info, plus list of companies
OpenStack: main activity charts based on information in the git repository, plus list of companies.

We extracted all information related to commits, and who performed them, from git metadata. Then, we used some heuristics and manual analysis to detect bots, and determine the companies for which committers are working. Based on that information, we have produced separated charts with the activity performed by specific companies.

OpenStack: Rackspace activity
Activity by committers working for Rackspace in the OpenStack project.

For each company, we are producing charts showing the number of commits and active committers per month, which may give an idea of how active the company is in the project (you know, commits and number of active committers are just proxies for activity, so your mileage may vary, etc. etc). We also provide information on the number of different repositories (each OpenStack git repository roughly corresponds to a subproject) and files touched per month, which suggest how wide the contributions by the company are (some companies are very concentrated on specific parts of OpenStack, while others are spread all over the project).
Continue reading “How companies are contributing to OpenStack”

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