How the automotive industry is participating in the development of GENIVI: BMW and Itestra leaders

After our visit to the Open Automotive’14 hosted by the Genivi Alliance, we have prepared a new version of the activity dashboard based on the preliminary Genivi Alliance report.

BMW (> 1,500 commits) keeps growing in the community, being the leader of the open source development process in GENIVI ecosystem, or at least to the publicly available repositories that Bitergia has had access. However, we do not find another automobile and engine manufacturing company until Ford (10 commits), with a discrete development participation. Although raising to the 5th position if counting commits from its owned subsidiary Livio Connect.

Top 10 affiliations contribution to the development of the GENIVI open source ecosystem

Top 10 affiliations contribution to the development of the GENIVI open source ecosystem

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May’s road trip

It is being an intense month in the marketing and business area, with lots of trips and interesting meetings. We started collaborating in a Developers Open Source Software event in Microsoft offices, and just one day later we were in Berlin for LinuxTag.

The new LinuxTag’s venue is great and it hosted two big events for three days (DroidCon and LinuxTag) and one day with the re:publica, so the atmosphere has been wonderful. Lots of interesting presentations and quality speakers. Even Bitergia has the chance to participate with a talk about how open development data benefits your project and your community.

The European Community Leadership Summit was on Friday 9th. We have been collaborating with it and we gave a talk about how to use available data from Development Community Metrics. It is the European version of the well known Community Leadership Summit hosted in Portland close the OSCON. It has been the first time that this event occurs in Europe, and the final feelings are quite positive. We are thinking about the next summit and regarding to this, we have started conversations with OpenExpo organization team to have something similar in Spain next June. So, if you are a community leadership willing to share your experiences with us, just let us know!

We have also travelled to Gothenburg for the OpenAutomotive’14, to show our services regarding Open Source projects management, development metrics and analytics to some Genivi Alliance members. It has been just two intense days, seeing how the community has grown, and the potential of embedded systems and free/libre open source software combination on automotive industry.

If haven’t seen our preliminary Genivi Alliance activity, take a look! Seeing companies like BMW or Valeo producing Open Source software, sharing ideas with Jaguar / Land Rover or Volvo about going open makes a clear picture of how important FLOSS is for automotive industry.

And the month will end with a trip to Poznan for another MARKOS plenary meeting (one of the research projects we are working on)..

Update: We have published some photos from the previous meetings:

Preliminary Genivi Alliance report

We will be in Gothenburg for the Open Automotive’14 hosted by the Genivi Alliance, so we have been playing with our tools to produce a preliminary dashboard of Genivi Alliance activity.

Will you continue considering BMW just an automobile, motorcycle and engine manufacturing company after adding more than 650K lines of code in almost 3 years of project??

BMW domain presece in Genivi Alliance projects

Microsoft openness in a simple chart

Last week I took part as master of ceremonies on an special event for FLOSS developers at .. Microsoft Spain offices! The idea for the meeting was to explore the different FLOSS technologies already supported by Microsoft Azure with speakers from different companies and communities like MongoDB, PhoneGap/Cordova, etc.

The event is part of the new openness strategy that is driving the company. But, I have thought about how open is really this movement? Of course, they are releasing a lot of code as Open Source, but is the company contributing to other FLOSS projects beyond their own ones? And by suprise, the answer has come from our own dashboards.

Chart with Microsoft contributions to OpenStack

Microsoft contributions to OpenStack


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The OpenStack Icehouse release: activity and organizations

[This post is based on the Executive Summary and other sections of the full report about OpenStack and the Icehouse release (part of OpenStack reports) and data retrieved from the OpenStack Activity Board, both developed by Bitergia]

At the moment of this analysis OpenStack projects are close to reach the 74,000 commits since their start as observed in the Activity Board. That activity was developed by more than 2,000 different contributors that at some point started 68,000 code reviews processes and sent and reviewed close to 270,000 different patches. There are more than 33,600 reports in the ticketing system, that were opened by 3,303 different participants. And high activity is also registered in the discussions forums, with close to 52,000 emails messages posted by 2,800 participants and more than 6,200 questions in the OpenStack question and answer tool.

Focus on the development activity, developers can be divided into 246 core developers, 461  with regular activity and 1,214 occasional ones that at some point submitted some patches and contributed to the code.

Structure of the OpenStack community of developers

Structure of the OpenStack community of developers

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Companies contributing to Icehouse: preliminary results

Less than two weeks for a new release of the OpenStack software. As usual, we at Bitergia keep contributing to this project through the Comunity Activity Board project as part of the openstack-infra project. A beta version of our companies analysis of the Icehouse release is already available at the OpenStack releases dashboard, where previous releases are accessible as well: Havana, Grizzly, Folsom and Essex.

Preliminary number of commits per organization in the Icehouse release

Preliminary number of commits per organization in the Icehouse release

An interesting fact: while for previous releases contributing organizations changed a lot, from Havana to Icehouse release top contributors keep stable with no big changes. Even more: no big changes in the top organizations, and no big changes in the number of commits. The only new entry in the top ten is Intel, with the rest contributing in a similar way as they were in Havana.

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Measuring demographics: OpenStack as case study

Turnover is inevitable. Developers leave a project and others join it. And this effect may be more harmful in open source communities than in companies. Depending on the community, it is hard to find new people willing to participate. And even more, there is a knowledge gap left by those that gave up developing. So the issue is double: people leave and those leave a knowledge gap that in some cases is hard to fill.

However, is it possible to analyze that regeneration of developers? How good is my community retaining developers? Is it possible to measure the number of newcomers joining the community? It is clear that having this type of information is basic to define policies to attract new members, retain current ones and check if the current situation is driving the community to good terms.

This post is an example of the type of things that in Bitergia we are building on top of the CVSAnalY tool. In previous posts we introduced the concept of commit, its peculiarities as a metric, and several ways to calculate this, adding filters such as bots, merges or branches.

The demographics of open source communities allows us to understand how the community has evolved, and potentially how this community will evolve through the time. Demographics in open source communities can be seen as the typical analysis of pyramids of population in countries or cities. Typically on the top of the chart the oldest people are found, while the age decreases going to the bottom of the chart. Those are named as pyramids given their typical triangle shape. However during the last decades and in developed countries, this shape is moving to an inverted pyramid, although this is another discussion :).

Thanks to the study of the demographics of developers, it is possible to know a bit more about the community. We already introduced the demographics of the Linux Kernel, and this post is focus on the analysis of the OpenStack community as a case study. The following figure shows the demographics of the OpenStack community (daily updated in the OpenStack activity dashboard). The x-axis indicates the number of developers, while the y-axis  shows the timeframe of activity.

Demographics of the OpenStack developers community

Demographics of the OpenStack developers community

Green bars show the number of developers that in each of the periods started contributing with at least one commit. And blue bars show the number of those developers that still contribute to the community. By definition, a developer is still contributing to the community if a commit has been detected during the last six months. If not, this developer is considered as a developer that left the community. There may raise the case when a developer after more than six months, returns and submit another change to the source code. In this specific context, this developer would appear as not leaving the community.

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